Elise pelvic / floor exercise (green)

Elise pelvic / floor exercise (green)

KWD 90.00

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Description:

The Elise Pelvic Floor Exerciser is an easy-to-use, rechargeable pelvic floor exerciser with a range of clinically tested programs – providing relief from stress, urged and mixed incontinence as well as improving sexual wellbeing.
Pelvic floor exercisers are one of the most effective forms of continence management and provide a discreet, affordable and long-term solution for incontinence sufferers.
The Elise is provided with a Vaginal Probe but can be used with an Anal Probe to treat Faecal Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction.

The Elise sends a gentle stimulation to your pelvic floor through a vaginal probe, working your pelvic floor muscle for you and enabling you to develop your own muscle control. Along with pelvic floor exercises, the Elise gently strengthens and tones your pelvic floor muscle which in-turn improves the symptoms of incontinence (bladder weakness). Sessions last for just 20 minutes a day and should be used for a period of 12 weeks. Many see improvements within as little as 3-4 weeks.The Elise can also be used with an anal probe for the improvement of symptoms of bladder weakness in men, and of faecal incontinence .

Key features of the Elise Pelvic Floor Exerciser include:
•One Touch Memory – remembers the last program, strength and setting used
•LED Backlit Screen – easy-to-use, modern, colour screen for clearer visibility
•Optional Programs – 4 preset programs for optimal choice
•Comfortable Stimulation – gentle, comfortable stimulation with fine-tune adjustment settings for different levels of intensity
•Rechargeable Li-ion Battery – lightweight & compact with an external charger
•Safety Duration Override – unit will turn off after 20 minutes to ensure the pelvic floor muscle is not overworked

The Elise provides relief from 3 forms of incontinence:

* Stress Incontinence describes the involuntary leakage of urine when a person coughs, sneezes, strains or makes sudden movements. It is particularly common in women and occurs when the bladder neck and the other mechanisms that act to hold urine in the bladder are not working properly.

* Urge Incontinence describes an overactive bladder. A person may experience a strong and sudden urge to go to the toilet but are not always able to hold on, or have to go so frequently that it becomes inconvenient.

* Mixed Incontinence is a combination of both Stress and Urge Incontinence.

Advantages of using the Elise:

• It can reduce leakage – not simply contain it. Most women see significant results in as little as 3 weeks.
• It is drug-free with no side effects.
• It is safe and easy to use with preset programmes to suit your needs.
• It is discreet and can be used at home during your own time.
• It may help to avoid surgery
• It may improve sexual intimacy by toning your pelvic floor.

Do NOT use the Elise under the following circumstances:

• If you have a heart pacemaker or a heart rhythm problem
• If you are pregnant
• If you have been diagnosed or treated for cervical, or any pelvic, cancer
• If you have, or have had epilepsy
• Whilst driving, or during any activity in which involuntary muscle contractions may put the user at undue risk of injury
• Within 12 weeks of surgery in the area. Scars should be fully healed before use.

IF IN DOUBT, CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN.

BEFORE USE, PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING WARNINGS:
• Incontinence can have many causes. You should try to identify the type of incontinence and the cause before using the Elise.
• If you have a urinary infection or any skin irritations within the vagina, it is recommended not to use the Elise.
• Care must be taken if you are not experiencing normal sensation or feeling in your vagina.
• If you have a severe prolapse or any discomfort occurs when inserting the probe, consult your medical advisor before use.
• If you use a copper IUD, stop use immediately if you experience discomfort. There is a very small risk of stimulation of the uterine wall if the IUD is not correctly located.
NB: You may safely use the stimulator during menstruation, although it may be a little less comfortable.

Content:

  • 1 x Elise continence stimulator unit
  • 1 x Lead wire (L-IT1-NEW)
  • 1 x Short probe lead (L-VPCE)
  • 1 x Liberty probe (X-VP)
  • 1 x Li-ion battery (B-BL4B)
  • 1 x Charger cradle
  • 1 x Mains adaptor
  • 1 x Storage pouch
  • 1 x Instruction manual

FAQ for this product:

Why should I exercise my Pelvic Floor Muscles?

Pelvic floor exercises can strengthen and tone the muscle whilst also increasing the blood flow to this region.

Strong or toned pelvic floor muscles can support the extra weight of pregnancy, help in the second stage of labour and, by increasing circulation, assist in healing the perineum between the anus and vagina after birth.

When done regularly and correctly pelvic floor exercises can help to prevent stress incontinence, bladder weakness and prolapse in later life.

Another benefit of carrying out your pelvic floor exercises is that toned pelvic floor muscles can provide women within a greater level of satisfaction during sex, enabling them to experience orgasm.

Exercising and maintaining the strength of your pelvic floor is also important in reducing the symptoms of incontinence.

If you are struggling to complete pelvic floor exercises on your own, you can try using a pelvic floor muscle stimulator.

Pelvic Floor Stimulators send a gentle electrical signal through a vaginal or anal probe which stimulates the pelvic floor muscle, therefore exercising it for you. Results can often be seen and felt in as little as 3 weeks.

Why do I keep getting the ‘LEADS’ message on my Pelvic Floor Exerciser?

Resolving ‘LEADS’ Message on your Pelvic Floor Exerciser

There are 2 main reasons why you may be getting the ‘LEADS’ message on your control unit:

  1. Fault in the lead wires or probe connections

An intermittent break in the lead, or the short lead attached to the probe, could be the cause of your LEAD fault. You can purchase a replacement set of leads via the ‘Accessories’ page.

  1. You just aren’t the right shape for this probe

Peoples’ bodies vary. If there isn’t enough contact on the electrode plates the electric current cannot flow.In this instance, you could try:

  1. i) Using a water-based lubricant gel such as Go Gel to improve the contact.
    ii) Try using a different probe:The Liberty Plus is 4mm wider providing better contact for some women.

No sensation and LEADS alarm showing.

Check lead and probe connection:

Dampen your hand with water and a little table salt. Squeeze the probe firmly in your hand and carefully increase the strength until you can feel something or LEADS alarm shows.
a) If you CAN’T feel anything, either the lead or the unit is faulty
b) If you CAN feel something on your hand, and the LEADS alarm does NOT show, then there is nothing wrong with the unit or lead.

The electrical conductivity of the vagina varies widely. The LEAD detection circuit in the product is there as a safety feature to ensure any rapid changes in connection cannot cause very uncomfortable, rapid changes in stimulation.
nfortunately this means that some users, who fall outside of the general range, may experience unwanted LEADS alarms.

If you experience unwanted LEADS alarm, please try:

  1. i)  Using a water–based lubricant which will improve conduction
    ii) Purchasing a larger probe: the Liberty Plus probe is 4mm wider than the standard Liberty probe
    iii) Crossing your legs and squeezing to increase pressure on the probe, which should improve the connection. If this enables you to use the unit, you should find that in a few weeks of stimulation the contact improves.

If none of the above solves your issue, then we are sorry to say that the unit will not work for you.

 

 

No sensation and no LEADS alarm
If you have tried the test above and DO have sensation when the probe is in your hand, then you may have reduced sensitivity due to previously damaged or desensitized pudendal nerves (this can happen in childbirth or some surgical procedures).
Please contact your GP for advice.

No sensation on one side
The current flows from one side of the probe to other, so it is not possible to have one side “not working”.
However, the strength of the sensation depends on how close to the nerve the current flows and also in which direction it flows relative to the nerve.
You can try slightly adjusting the position of the probe, or exchanging the connection of the wires in the probe.

What strength should I use and how do I adjust the strength as my pelvic floor muscles improve?

The stronger the contraction, the more exercise you do and the faster the muscle will increase in strength. The sensory nerves are more sensitive than the motor nerves, so you will need to feel the stimulation quite strongly to be sure to exercise the muscle properly.

In principle, you should turn up the strength as high as you can stand it. You should at least feel the muscle start to pull upwards, this is a good level at which to start your first session. However, when you first start exercising any muscle strongly, you may get aches afterwards.

If you don’t work the muscles, you won’t get aches but you won’t get results either. When you are starting, it’s best to set the strength quite high, but limit the length of the session to five or ten minutes.

If you don’t get aches the next day, you can gradually increase the strength and duration. As the muscle strengthens you will find that you can increase strength and duration. If you set the strength much too high, you might strain a muscle and the discomfort could take several days to fade away.

People vary in sensitivity to electrostimulation – there are lots of variables that can affect what you feel – however most people won’t feel much below about 20.0, and some will use the maximum 99.5.

Before your first use, try moistening the probe, holding it in your hand, and adjusting the strength to see what it feels like – remembering that your hand is actually much more sensitive than your pelvic floor.

What position is best when using Pelvic Floor Exercisers?

You can use it in any position, but most people would find it more comfortable reclining on the sofa or lying in bed with the knees slightly drawn up.

You can also lie on your side with a pillow between your knees if you find it more comfortable.

It is important to find a comfortable position before beginning your 20 minute sessions.

How you know if you have positioned the Liberty probe correctly?

The Liberty Vaginal probe should be inserted with the rim facing upwards and downwards, with the metal electrode plates to left and right (outwards towards your thighs).

If you orientate the probe incorrectly, you may only have sensation on one side (however this can also happen if you suffered nerve damage during birth).

Insert until the rim at the base of the electrode is sited between the labia. It’s fairly difficult to get this wrong. If you don’t insert it far enough, you will probably feel that the stimulation is in the wrong place.

If you do not feel any sensation at all, you may require a larger probe.

How does continence stimulation help Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI)?

Approximately 30% of women who experience incontinence are unable to voluntarily contract the pelvic floor muscle and require additional assistance to aid in their pelvic floor training.

This is where continence stimulation is vitally important in the re-training of the pelvic floor muscles.

Pelvic Floor Stimulation (PFS) is a non-invasive treatment which activates natural neuromuscular mechanisms and is aimed at exercising and toning the pelvic floor muscles.

In the case of Stress Incontinence (SUI), PFS automates pelvic floor exercises via a pudendal nerve reflex. Unlike other treatments, PFS has no side-effects, always exercises the right muscles and does not require active patient participation.

Numerous studies have reported that 70% of patients are either improved or cured using PFS.

Like any other muscle building, stimulation for Stress Incontinence takes time to work, You should expect to exercise for at least 12 weeks for best results.

PFS also works in the same way for the treatment of faecal incontinence or urinary incontinence in men, if used with an anal probe instead of a vaginal probe.

How Can Pelvic floor help me?

1 in 3 women (50% of women over 40), and 1 in 7 men will suffer from some form of incontinence during their lives; be it post-childbirth or later in life as pelvic floor muscles weaken.

The severity of incontinence can vary. Even though it is not considered life-threatening, it can cause depression, isolation and soreness. Pelvic floor exercisers are recognised as an effective method of strengthening the muscles that support the bladder and bowel, and are a more cost-effective, better long-term solution than containment pads.

Why use a TensCare Pelvic Floor Exerciser?

Pelvic floor exercisers and trainers are seen as the most effective way to prevent issues with incontinence. Yet, 1 in 3 women do not know how or are unable to voluntarily exercise their pelvic floor muscle themselves. Pelvic Floor Exercisers can play a vital role in educating women about their pelvic floor and the sensation they should feel when doing pelvic floor exercises, helping to improve muscle tone and associated problems. They can also train pelvic floor muscles in men by using electrical stimulation through an anal probe or electrode.

Benefits to using a TensCare Pelvic Floor Exerciser:

  • Safe and drug-free with no side effects
  • Easy-to-use at home
  • Non-surgical
  • Clinically proven programmes
  • Reduces the usage of containment pads
  • Improves sexual stimulation for women through strengthened pelvic floor muscle
  • Can help to reduce leakage
  • Discreet
  • Helps to avoid rectal prolapse
  • Helps to ease chronic pelvic pain
  • Helps men’s prostate to function

How can Pelvic Floor Exercisers help Urinary Incontinence?

Pelvic Floor Exercisers are portable EMS (Electrical Muscle Stimulation) units which help to build the pelvic muscle strength whilst educating women how to control their pelvic floor. Pelvic Floor Exercisers work by sending gentle stimulation (EMS) to your pelvic floor muscle through a vaginal or anal probe, or via self adhesive electrode pads using clinically recognised programmes. The units exercise and tone the pelvic floor muscle helping you to gain control of your bladder naturally. For best results, it is recommended to use your Pelvic Floor Exerciser in conjunction with Kegel Exercises for best results.

The benefits of pelvic floor exercises for women, particularly after childbirth, are well documented. However, these simple exercises are also very valuable for men following prostatectomy or other prostate surgery where removing the prostate has damaged the area between the bladder and urethra resulting in some form of urinary incontinence whether it is Stress, Mixed or Urge.

A study following men through the first year after prostatectomy found pelvic floor exercises are effective in terms of reducing incontinence. The iTouch Sure Pelvic Floor Exerciser for Men locates and tones your pelvic floor muscle helping you to rebuild muscle strength and reduce any accidental leakages.

How can Pelvic Floor Exercisers help Faecal Incontinence?

Faecal incontinence can be the result of weakened or poorly functioning anal sphincter muscles or damage to the nerves controlling them.

Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) can be used to re-educate the anal sphincter to contract. The treatments aim to progress towards graduated active exercises, in order to improve pelvic floor muscles strength and endurance and to regain function.

How do men use a Pelvic Floor Exerciser?

The iTouch Sure is a discreet unit with an intra-anal probe. The unit uses comfortable muscle stimulation to exercise your pelvic floor muscle to aid recovery from urinary and faecal incontinence.

For the more common Urge incontinence, the iTouch Sure is supplied with self-adhesive electrode pads that are placed either side of the spine. It uses gentle electrical stimulation to sooth irritable bladder muscles. Additional electrode pads, replacement probes and Go Gel lubricating gel are all available to purchase as accessories.

Clinically proven

A recent clinical trial carried out on the TensCare iTouch Sure Pelvic Floor Exerciser has been conducted in the US with excellent results.  Participants in the study experienced a 57.1% reduction in the use of continence pads and a significant improvement in incontinence episodes after only 12 weeks of using the iTouch Sure. The chart below provides the results from the clinical trial:

How can Pelvic Floor Exercisers be used for Men?

Pelvic Floor Exercisers can be used for men with the use of an anal probe instead of a vaginal probe for the treatment of urinary incontinence.

The same settings and programmes can be used on the machines, which can also be used with an anal probe for the treatment of faecal incontinence.

The stimulation cannot be restricted to one muscle group, and the mucosal tissue has different electrical characteristics, therefore anal stimulation is less comfortable than vaginal.

You should always consult your physician before starting treatment. 

Faecal Incontinence

Faecal incontinence can be the result of weakened or poorly functioning anal sphincter muscles or damage to the nerves controlling them. The purpose is to re-educate the anal sphincter and other muscles of the pelvic floor to contract.

The treatments aim to progress towards graduated active exercises, in order to improve pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance and to regain function.

You may benefit from Pelvic Floor Exercisers if you either have no active anal sphincter contraction, or a weak or poorly sustained contraction.

Use the STRESS or TONE programmes.

Intensity should be as strong as possible without being painful. When possible, try to contract the muscles at the same time as the Pelvic Floor Exerciser.

Post Prostatectomy Urinary Incontinence

Electrical stimulation has been found to help urinary incontinence in men after radical prostatectomy in some trials.

Use the same programmes as for vaginal stimulation.

Increase intensity in Stress, Mixed, or Tone programmes to the highest tolerable.

 

Can Pelvic Floor Exercises benefit men too?

The benefits of pelvic floor exercises for women, particularly after childbirth, are well established. However these simple exercises are also very valuable for men following prostatectomy (the removal of the prostate due to a diagnosis of cancer). During the first few weeks after a prostatectomy, almost all patients experience some urinary incontinence.

This is because removing the prostate disturbs the area between the bladder and urethra, which carries urine out of the body. During surgery, the bladder is pulled down to join the urethra and in so doing, restoring continuity. The bladder neck muscle (internal sphincter) is sometimes also weakened during surgery.

Consequently, before surgery men had three layers holding back urine – the internal sphincter muscle, the prostate lobes and an external sphincter muscle. After surgery, there is only one layer – the external sphincter.

This means that the single barrier needs to work very well. Therefore, pelvic floor exercises which strengthen these muscles can be very effective in the recovery of continence. A study following men through the first year after prostatectomy found pelvic floor exercises are effective in terms of reducing incontinence.

The type of incontinence experienced by men in the first three months after a prostatectomy is typically mild leaking. But this can be very distressing for patients as they recover from surgery and want to return to normal life. Even when incontinence is mild, men are understandably uncomfortable about having to wear pads to work, for example.

Pelvic floor exercises are an unusual concept to most men, as they are far more closely associated with women. However we find that the majority of our patients are keen to do anything they can to improve their continence. Pelvic floor exercises are a valuable means of patients doing something themselves to aid their recovery.

We emphasise that exercises should be done little and often. In many cases, patients expect results too quickly. We make the comparison with improving your muscle tone in the gym. You will not get results immediately, nor will you develop a six pack if you pop down once a week. Improving bladder function through pelvic floor exercises, like muscle tone, requires effective practice, consistency and long term commitment.

By three months post surgery, 70 per cent of patients are continent. This is defined as no longer needing continence pads. Once patients have reached a year post surgery, only four per cent of patients are significantly incontinent. Among this group of patients who continue to experience incontinence after one year, many are older men and some will have had continence problems before surgery.

It is difficult to quantify exactly to what extent the recovery of continence is due to bulking up the muscles through pelvic floor exercises and how much is due to the natural healing process.

Can pelvic floor exercisers help with Pelvic Pain?

Using the “Urge” programme encourages your body to produce endorphins – your own natural painkiller – and can help to relieve pelvic pain. The Urge programmes can be used with either a vaginal or anal probe.

Perfect PFE and Perfect PFE for men include a PAIN program which is designed specifically for Chronic Pelvic Pain, which can be due to several causes.

For example on women could be because of Vulvodynia (pain the vulva), Symphysis Pubis (pain possible caused of a misalignment of the pelvis) or Interstitial Cystitis (bladder pain syndrome).

With men, could be chronic prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome: unexplained chronic pelvic pain associated with irritative voiding symptoms and/or pain located in the groin, genitalia, or perineum in the absence of pyuria and bacteriuria.

Otherwise (if you do not need the machine for incontinence or Pelvic Pain), you can use a general TENS machine (not a pelvic floor exerciser) and use external self-adhesive electrodes to place around the area of pain.

Can I use a pelvic floor exerciser if I have a vaginal prolapse?

 

If you have a prolapse, you should consult your medical advisor before use.

Increased muscle tone may help contain the prolapse, but, if the prolapse is severe, working the muscle strongly or inserting the probe may cause futher issues before other treatment is carried out.

A severe, or Grade 3 prolapse has symptoms as follows:

  • Prolapse worsening
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Ability to feel organs descending into the vagina
  • Pain with sitting
  • Incomplete bowel emptying
  • Inability to have intercourse.

 

Made in UK.

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